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Were you born into a atheist family?

Posted: November 8th 2012

EXSTEN

No, I was born into a very committed evangelical Christian family.

Posted: January 3rd 2013

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Eric_PK

My father was a Lutheran minister, so the answer is “No”.

Posted: December 17th 2012

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Dave Hitt www

No, I was born into a very religious family. I was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness.

I despised my life under the thumb of the cult, and in researching it I discovered it was all nonsense. It was a short step from that conclusion to realizing that all other religions were also foolish, based on superstition that was in direct opposition to observable facts.

Posted: December 7th 2012

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Mike the Infidel www

No. I was raised in the United Church of Christ by two devout (albeit quite liberal) Christian parents.

Posted: November 11th 2012

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George Locke

Yes. My parents read various myths to me as a child, including a children’s Bible, Hindu epics, and folk tales. We went to a Unitarian Universalist church a few times, whose pastor was a friend of mine, but neither religion nor the supernatural was discussed much at home. When I was in grade school, I invented some vague ideas about reincarnation that, in retrospect, resemble Hindu cycles pretty closely. In high school I was a strict (and vocal) materialist.

In college, I arrived at a sort of a new-agey spiritualism. Over the course of about five years, I slowly realized that the spirits I believed in were just useful fictions of my own invention, and now I’m an atheist again. I only asked my parents about their beliefs recently, and they’re atheists, but atheism doesn’t seem to be an important issue for them.

Posted: November 9th 2012

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Galen Rose www

No, but religion was never discussed in my home and we didn’t go to church.

My parents were divorced when I was 5, and I lived thereafter with my mother, although I saw my Dad once a week. The only mention of religion I ever heard from either parent (that I can remember) was one comment by my Dad when I was a teenager. He said something approximating, “Just keep your Bible and your checkbook close at hand.” That’s it. I didn’t ask him anything about his statement because religion was irrelevant to me at the time.

When I was 6, I saw another kid praying and asked him what he was doing. I had never heard of prayer before so he explained it to me. For a year or so after that I had a standard almost-daily prayer – asking to be able to sit once more in the apple tree in the backyard of our old house. Nothing happened, so I gave it up and never took religion seriously again (except as a negative force in the world).

Posted: November 9th 2012

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brian thomson www

I’m originally from Scotland, with both parents from the Glasgow area, and they had the local equivalent of a “mixed marriage”. I had a mother who was moderately Catholic and a father who was mildly Presbyterian. My mother cared more, so I was taken to Catholic church, but even at a young age, I think I understood that they could not be the only way to go.

My mother died just before I turned 13, and within a year I had stopped caring about religion entirely. I didn’t actively pull away, and it wasn’t a reaction to her death; it was just felt normal to stop. It was part of growing up.

Posted: November 9th 2012

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